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How Much Use?

 

64% of adult men and 42% of adult women view pornography at least monthly[1].

 

63% of young men (18-30) view pornography once a week or more.  79% view it at least monthly[2].

 

19% of young women (18-30) view porn once a week or more; 34% view it at least monthly. [3]

 

In the 1970s, 45% of young adult men viewed X rated movies. [4]

 

In the 1990s, found that 61% of young adult men were viewing porn, just before the Internet boom.[5] 

 

In the 2000s, with the Internet, 86% of young adult men were viewing pornography.[6] [7]

In the 1970s, 28% of young adult women had viewed X rated movies [9]. 

 

In the 2000s, 36% of young adult women had viewed pornography. [10]

Well over two-thirds of 15-17 year old adolescents have seen porn websites when they did not intend to access them.[12]

 

Between 2008 and 2011, exposure to porn among boys under the age of 13 jumped from 14% to 49%.  Boys’ daily use more than doubled[13].

 

The average child sees Internet pornography for the first time at age 11[14] [15].

 

Violence

 

88% of the scenes in today’s mainstream pornography include violence by a man toward a woman. [16]

 

95% of the time when a man hits a woman in pornography, she responds with pleasure or has no response at all. [17]

 

45% of the pornography clips on the Internet include at least one man ejaculating on a woman’s face[18]. 

Brain scans of men watching pornography react to women as if they are objects, not people. [19] This leads to more violence against women. [20]

 

Porn use increases the likelihood a man will commit sexual violence, especially if he is impulsive and uses pornography frequently.[21]

 

Over 100 studies show that pornography use is correlated with and is the cause of violence. [22]

 

22 recent studies from 7 countries found that whether you use correlational, cross-sectional, or longitudinal research designs, pornography and sexual violence are directly connected.[23] 

 

500 studies of the connection between pornography and the broad category of “gender based violence” found that pornography use leads to gender-based violence.[24] 

 

Thousands of revenge porn websites allow men to upload naked or pornographic pictures of a former girlfriend or wife for everyone in the world to see.[25]

 

Children are particularly susceptible to what they see in pornography.  The more they view it, the more they perform the violent acts they see in porn.[26]

 

Women in the pornography industry are three times as likely to have been sexually abused as children, 50% more likely to be living in poverty, and twice as likely as the average woman to have grown up in poverty.  [27] [28]

 

Brain Science

 

Over time, pornography use re-routes the neural pathways in the brain to prefer sexual images over people.[29] 

 

The more people watch pornography, the more their brains shrink, particularly in the areas responsible for motivation and decision-making. [30]    

 

Viewing porn slows down short-term memory. [31]

 

Continued, addictive use of pornography, stimulates brain chemicals to tell the body to seek more extreme porn.[32]

 

Porn Use = Bad Sex

 

The more pornography men view, the less satisfied they are with their partner – both generally and with their sexual relationship.[33] 

 

The more pornography a man watches, the more he also watches porn on a mobile device during a sexual encounter.  [34]

 

The more time a man watches porn, the more likely he is to ask his partner to do things he saw in porn. [35]

 

The more a man watches porn, the more he has to think about what he saw in porn to remain aroused. [36]

 

The more a man watches porn, the more he is concerned with how he performs sexually. [37]

 

The more men use porn, the less they enjoy sex and the worse they feel about how their body looks.[38]

 

The most common behavior men ask female partners to do from what they learned is porn is to engage in anal sex. Females describe this as painful, risky, and coercive.[39]

 

Porn Causes Erectile Dysfunction

 

60% of men who are addicted to pornography have erectile dysfunction with a woman, but not when they use pornography[40]. 

 

In the 1940s, less than 1% of men under 30 had erectile dysfunction. [41] 

 

In the 1990s, with more porn available, 7% of men under 30 had erectile dysfunction.[42]

 

In the 2010’s, with Internet porn, 26% of male adolescents and 30% of men report ED.[43] [44]

 

In the U.S. military, 33% of men age 21-40 have ED. [45]

 

From 2004 to 2013, ED more than doubled in the military. [46]   

 

Doctors report that in the 20th century, almost no men under 40 complained of ED.  Today, one in four new ED patients are under the age of 40.[47]

 

High school boys who consume porn more than once a week have ED and other sexual dysfunction levels twice as high as men who consume less than once a week.[48]

 

Religion

 

The more men were motivated to be religious because it could help their social standing, the more they use pornography. [49]

 

The more men and women are motivated to be religious for selfless reasons, with a desire to have ones beliefs and behavior match, the less they view pornography.[50] [51]

 

The more boys and girls are integrated into their religious group, school, family, and community, the less they consume pornography.[52] 

 

Christian Colleges

 

Among male students at Christian colleges, 14% viewed pornography monthly, an additional 20% viewed it at least weekly, and 5% more viewed it at least daily.  Only 14% never saw pornography.  [53] 

 

Only 3% of women on Christian college campuses view pornography monthly or more; 80% have never seen it. [54] 

 

The more that students at Christian colleges report their life is influenced by their religious beliefs, the less they view pornography. [55]

 

The more that men at evangelical Christian colleges access Internet pornography, the more guilt they experience about their use. [56]

 

Men attending evangelical Christian colleges who do not personally identify as evangelical, look at pornography more hours each week than evangelical men.[57]

 

Sexting

 

One in five sext messages are pictures of children 15 years old or younger; almost all of girls, almost all taken with a webcam[58]

 

Sexters are 4.5 times more likely to have had unprotected sex, four times more likely to view pornography, and about 2.5 times more likely to chat online with people they don’t know. [59]

 

Profits

 

Worldwide pornography revenues were $100 billion annually (Ropelato, 2010). This is more than the combined revenues of Microsoft, Google, Amazon, eBay, Yahoo, Apple, and Netflix.[60]

 

In the U.S., the porn industry makes $13 billion annually.  That is more than the National Football League, Major League Baseball, and the National Basketball Association combined.[61]

 

Child pornography accounts for 20% of the profits in the pornography industry[62].  

 

References:

 

[1] Digital Journal (2014) How many Christians do you think watch porn? Available at http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/2123093.

 

[2] 2014 ProvenMen.org Pornography Addiction Survey (conducted by Barna Group). The survey results are located at www.provenmen.org/2014pornsurvey/pornography-use-and-addiction.

 

[3] 2014 ProvenMen.org Pornography Addiction Survey (conducted by Barna Group). The survey results are located at www.provenmen.org/2014pornsurvey/pornography-use-and-addiction.

 

[4] Price, J., Patterson, R., Regnerus, M., & Walley, J. (2015). How much more XXX is Generation X consuming? Evidence of changing attitudes and behaviors related to pornography since 1973, The Journal of Sex Research, doi: 10.1080/00224499.2014.1003773.

 

[5] Price, J., Patterson, R., Regnerus, M., & Walley, J. (2015). How much more XXX is Generation X consuming? Evidence of changing attitudes and behaviors related to pornography since 1973, The Journal of Sex Research, doi: 10.1080/00224499.2014.1003773.

 

[6] Braun-Courville, D. K., & Rojas, M. (2009). Exposure to sexually explicit Web sites and adolescent sexual attitudes and behaviors. The Journal Of Adolescent Health: Official Publication Of The Society For Adolescent Medicine, 45(2), 156-162. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2008.12.004

 

[7] Carroll, J. S., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Nelson, L. J., Olson, C. D., Barry, C. M., & Madsen, S. D. (2008). Generation XXX. Journal of Adolescent Research, 23(1), 6-30. 

[9] Price, J., Patterson, R., Regnerus, M., & Walley, J. (2015). How much more XXX is Generation X consuming? Evidence of changing attitudes and behaviors related to pornography since 1973, The Journal of Sex Research, doi: 10.1080/00224499.2014.1003773.

 

[10] Price, J., Patterson, R., Regnerus, M., & Walley, J. (2015). How much more XXX is Generation X consuming? Evidence of changing attitudes and behaviors related to pornography since 1973, The Journal of Sex Research, doi: 10.1080/00224499.2014.1003773.

[12]  Kaiser Family Foundation. Generation Rx.com: how young people use the Internet for health information. Menlo Park (CA)7 Kaiser Family Foundation; 2001.

 

[13] Sun, C., Bridges, A., Johnson, J., & Ezzell, M. (2014). Pornography and the male sexual script: An analysis of consumption and sexual relations. Archives of sexual behavior, 1-12.

 

[14] Dines, G. (2010). Pornland: How porn has hijacked our sexuality. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.

 

[15] DeKeseredy, W. S. & Corsianos, M. (2016). Violence Against Women in Pornography.  New York: Routledge. 

 

[16] Bridges, A.J., Wosnitzer, R., Scharrer, E. Sun, C., & Liberman, R. (2010). Aggression and sexual behavior in best-selling pornography videos: A content analysis update.  Violence Against Women, 16, 1065-1085.

 

[17] Bridges, A.J., Wosnitzer, R., Scharrer, E. Sun, C., & Liberman, R. (2010). Aggression and sexual behavior in best-selling pornography videos: A content analysis update.  Violence Against Women, 16, 1065-1085.

 

[18] Gorman S, Monk-Turner E, Fish J. (2010). Free adult Internet web sites: How prevalent are degrading acts? Gender Issues, 27 (3-4), 131-145.

 

[19] Eberstadt, M. & Layden, M.A. (2010).  The social costs of pornography: A statement of findings and recommendations.  Princeton, NJ: The Witherspoon Institute.

 

[20] Haslam, N., & Loughnan, S. (2014). Dehumanization and infrahumanization.Annual Review of Psychology, 65, 399-423.

 

[21] Kingston, D. A., Malamuth, N. M., Fedoroff, P., & Marshall, W. L. (2009). The importance of individual differences in pornography use: Theoretical perspectives and implications for treating sexual offenders. Journal of Sex Research, 46(2/3), 216-232. doi:10.1080/00224490902747701

 

[22] Malamuth, N. M., Addison, T. & Koss, M. P. (2000).  Pornography and sexual aggression: Are there reliable effects and can we understand them?  Annual Review of Sex Research, 11, 26-91.

 

[23] Wright, P.J., Tokunaga, R.S., & Kraus, A. (2015). A Meta-Analysis of Pornography Consumption and Actual Acts of Sexual Aggression in General Population Studies.  Journal of Communication. doi:10.1111/jcom.12201

 

[24] Waltman, M. (2014).  The politics of legal challenges to pornography.  Doctoral Dissertation.

 

[25] Hart B (2014) Revenge Porn. Portland, Maine: Muskie School of Public Service.

 

[26]   Wright, P. J. (2014). Pornography and the sexual socialization of children: Current knowledge and a theoretical future. Journal of Children and Media, 8(3), 305-312.

 

[27] Waltman, M. (2014).  The politics of legal challenges to pornography.  Doctoral Dissertation.

 

[28] DeKeseredy, W. S. & Corsianos, M. (2016). Violence Against Women in Pornography.  New York: Routledge. 

 

[29] Wilson, G. (2015).  Your brain on porn: Internet pornography and the emerging science of addiction.  Kent, England: Commonwealth Publishing.

 

[30] Kuhn, S. & Gallinat, J. (2014). Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity Associated With Pornography Consumption The Brain on Porn.  JAMA Psychiatry, doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.93.

 

[31] Laier, C., Schulte, F. P., & Brand, M. (2013). Pornographic picture processing interferes with working memory performance. Journal of Sex Research, 50(7), 642-652. doi:10.1080/00224499.2012.716873

 

[32] Eberstadt, M. & Layden, M.A. (2010).  The social costs of pornography: A statement of findings and recommendations.  Princeton, NJ: The Witherspoon Institute.

 

[33] Bridges, A.  Personal communication. 

 

[34] Sun, C. Bridges, A., Johnason, J., & Ezzell, M. (2015).  Pornography and the male sexual script: An analysis of consumption and sexual relations.  Archives of Sexual Behavior.  doi: 10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2

 

[35] Sun, C. Bridges, A., Johnason, J., & Ezzell, M. (2015).  Pornography and the male sexual script: An analysis of consumption and sexual relations.  Archives of Sexual Behavior.  doi: 10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2

 

[36] Sun, C. Bridges, A., Johnason, J., & Ezzell, M. (2015).  Pornography and the male sexual script: An analysis of consumption and sexual relations.  Archives of Sexual Behavior.  doi: 10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2

 

[37] Sun, C. Bridges, A., Johnason, J., & Ezzell, M. (2015).  Pornography and the male sexual script: An analysis of consumption and sexual relations.  Archives of Sexual Behavior.  doi: 10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2

 

[38] Sun, C. Bridges, A., Johnason, J., & Ezzell, M. (2015).  Pornography and the male sexual script: An analysis of consumption and sexual relations.  Archives of Sexual Behavior.  doi: 10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2

 

[39]  Marston, C. & Lewis, R. (2014). Anal heterosex among young people and implications for health promotion: a qualitative study in the UK. BMJ Open, 4(8), e004996-e004996. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-004996

 

[40] Voon V, Mole TB, Banca P, Porter L, Morris L, et al. (2014) Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviors. PLoS ONE 9(7): e102419. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0102419

 

[41] Kinsey, A.C., Pomeroy, W.B., & Martin, C.E. (1948) Sexual behavior in the human male.  Philadelphia: WB Saunders.

 

[42] Laumann, E.O., Paik, A., & Rosen, R.C. (1999).  Sexual dysfunction in the United States: Prevalence and predictors.  Journal of the American Medical Association, 281(6), 537-544.

 

[43] O’Sullivan, L.F., Brotto, L.A., Byers, E.S., Majerovich, J.A., Weust, J.A.  (2014). Prevalence and characteristics of sexual functioning among sexually experienced mid to late adolescents.  The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 11, 630-641.

 

[44]  Mialon, A., Berchtold, A., Michaud, P.A., Gmel, G. & Suris, J.C. (2012).  Sexual dysfunctions among young men: Prevalence and associated factors.  Journal of Adolescent Health, 51(1), 25-31.

 

[45] Wilcox, S.L., Redmond, S., and Hassan, A.M. (2014).  Sexual functioning in military personnel: Preliminary estimates and predictors.  Journal of Sexual Medicine, 11 (10), 2537-2545.

 

[46] Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (2014).  Erectile dysfunction among male active component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2004-2013.  Monthly Surveillance Monthly Report, 21(9), 13-16. 

 

[47] Capogrosso, P., Colicchia, M., Ventimiglia, E., Castagna, G., Clementi, M.C., Suardi, N., Castiglione, F., Briganti, A., Cantiello, F. Damiano, R., Montorsi, F., & Salonia, A. (2013). One patient out of four with newly diagnosed erectile dysfunction is a young man--worrisome picture from the everyday clinical practice.  Journal of Sexual Medicine, 10(7), 1833-1841.

 

[48] Damiano, P., Alessandro, B., and Carlo, F. (2015). Adolescents and web porn: a new era of sexuality.  International Journal of Adolescent Medical Health.  doi: 10.1515/ijamh-2015-0003.

 

[49] Short, M.B., Kasper, T.E., & Wetterneck, C.T. (2015). The Relationship Between Religiosity and Internet Pornography Use. Journal of Religion and Health, 54, 571-583.

 

[50]  Foubert, J. D., & Rizzo, A. J. (2013). Integrating religiosity and pornography use into the prediction of bystander efficacy and willingness to prevent sexual assault. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 41(3), 242-251.

 

[51] Short, M.B., Kasper, T.E., & Wetterneck, C.T. (2015). The Relationship Between Religiosity and Internet Pornography Use. Journal of Religion and Health, 54, 571-583.

 

[52] Mesch, G. S. (2009). Social bonds and Internet pornographic exposure among adolescents. Journal of Adolescence , 32 , 601–618.

 

[53] Lastoria, M., & Association for Christians in Student Development. (2011). Sexuality, religiosity, behaviors, attitudes: A look at religiosity, sexual attitudes and sexual behaviors of Christian college students ; a survey study. Houghton, N.Y: ACSD, Houghton College.

 

[54] Lastoria, M., & Association for Christians in Student Development. (2011). Sexuality, religiosity, behaviors, attitudes: A look at religiosity, sexual attitudes and sexual behaviors of Christian college students ; a survey study. Houghton, N.Y: ACSD, Houghton College.

 

[55] Lastoria, M., & Association for Christians in Student Development. (2011). Sexuality, religiosity, behaviors, attitudes: A look at religiosity, sexual attitudes and sexual behaviors of Christian college students ; a survey study. Houghton, N.Y: ACSD, Houghton College.

 

[56]  Chelsen, P. O. (2011). An examination of Internet pornography usage among male students at evangelical Christian colleges. ProQuest LLC.

 

[57]  Chelsen, P. O. (2011). An examination of Internet pornography usage among male students at evangelical Christian colleges. ProQuest LLC.

 

[58]  Internet Watch Foundation in partnership with Microsoft Emerging Patterns and Trends Report #1. Youth-Produced Sexual Content.  March 10, 2015.

 

[59]  Crimmins, D. M., & Seigfried-Spellar, K. C. (2014). Peer attachment, sexual experiences, and risky online behaviors as predictors of sexting behaviors among undergraduate students. Computers in Human Behavior, 32, 268-275. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2013.12.012

 

[60] DeKeseredy, W. S. & Corsianos, M. (2016). Violence Against Women in Pornography.  New York: Routledge. 

 

[61] Ropelato J. (2010) Internet pornography statistics. TopTenReviews.com. Available at http://Internet-filter-review.toptenreviews.com/Internet-pornography-statistics.html

 

[62] United States House of Representatives, testimony of Ernie Allen.  Sexual exploitation of children over the Internet: What parents, kids, and congress need to know about child predators: Hearings before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, 109th Cong., 2d Sess. (2006)

(c) 2019 John Foubert

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